.                    Footnotes

 

1.     Robert Reich, “Saving Capitalism”; Vintage Books; New York; 2016; p.p. 116-117.

 

2.     Add 1% U.S. population growth between (1973-2001) to U.S. figures, and you get approximate GDP growth.

 

3.     The main goal of an export economy is to produce goods for the world market, and thus earn foreign exchange. This is different from the standard economic view that the aim of economic activity is to consume. In “The Wealth of Nations” (1776), Adam Smith writes, “Consumption is the sole end and purpose of all production…” (1986) W.W. Norton & Company, p. 284.

 

4.     William Outhwaite; “Social Theory and Postcommunism”; Blackwell Publishing; Maiden, Mass.; 2005; p.p. 114, 130, 131.

 

5.     Amy Goldstein; “Janesville”; Simon & Shuster; New York; 2017; p. 4.

 

6.     Ibid.; p. 111.

 

7.     Ibid.; 2011 Y.E. Data; p. 314.

 

8.     Ibid. p. 38.

 

9.     Ibid.; p. 281.

 

10.  Reich; p. 154.

 

11.  Ibid.; p. 188.

 

12.  Dani Rodrik; “One Economics Many Recipes”; Princeton University Press; 2007; p. 1.

 

13.  Ibid.; p. 21.

 

14.  Ibid.; p. 203.

 

15.  Ibid.; p. 39.

 

16.  Ibid.; p. 8.

 

17.  Ibid.; p. 15.

 

Professor Rodrik’s idea of economic “first-order principles” is a very useful idea that likely distinguishes all the social sciences from history.

 

18.  Jean-Pierre Vernant; “The Origins of Greek Thought”; Cornell University Press; Ithica, New York; 1982; p. 75.

 

19.  Rodrik, p.p. 25, 114.

 

20.  La Times; 9/22/16; “Temecula winemakers are sick of the haters…”

 

21.  Rodrik, p. 93.

 

22.  Goldstein; pp. 19-21.

 

 

 

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