Footnotes 

  

1.     It is said that to understand a civilization, you must understand its literature because that is how a people make a sense of things and deal with the complexities of life. Marcus Aurelius (121-180) wrote this passage in ancient Greek, the language of Roman scholarship. Because we don’t read Greek, we have translated this from the Latin, taking advantage of its classical clarity.

 

2.     John Locke; “Second Treatise of Government”; Hackett Publishing Company; Indianapolis, Indiana; 1980; p. 9.

 

3.     Isaiah Berlin; “The Power of Ideas”; Princeton University Press; Princeton, N.J.; 2000 (ed.); p. 12.

 

4.     Ibid; p. 13.

 

5.     Isaiah Berlin; “The Proper Study of Mankind (anthology)”; Farrar, Straus and Giroux; New York, N.Y.; 1997 (ed.); p. 495.

 

6.     Hamilton, Madison, and Jay; “The Federalist Papers”; Bantam Books; New York, N.Y.; 1992 (ed.); p.p. 316, 315.

 

7.     Edmund Burke; “Reflections on the Revolution in France”; Hackett Publishing Company; Indianapolis , Indiana; 1987 (ed.); p. 54.

 

8.     Isaiah Berlin; “The Proper Study of Mankind (anthology)”; Farrar, Straus and Giroux; New York, N.Y.; 1997 (ed.); p. 495.

Applying this to investing: People should decide whether they are long-term or short-term investors and act accordingly. Long-term investing requires patience, and short-term investing is for traders.

9.     Wikipedia; “John Rawls”; accessed 8/14/18.

 

10.  John Rawls; “The Idea of Public Reason Revisited”; The University of Chicago Law Review; Summer, 1997; p.p. 784-785.

 

11.  Ibid; 786.

 

12.  Ibid; 769.

 

13.  Ibid; 802.

 

14.  Ibid; 788.

 

15.  Rachel Botsman; “Who Can You Trust?”; Hachette Book Group; New York, N.Y.; 2017; p. 123.

 

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